Off the Dial

Diabetes Podcast Week 2018

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“Why on earth would you promote other people’s podcasts?”

I’ve been asked this question a lot since I started Diabetes Podcast Week in 2016.  In radio (my past life) you would never mention a competitor’s name, let alone link their show up on your site. But podcasting is different. And podcasting about diabetes is completely different. I’ll explain more, but first…

Diabetes Podcast Week kicks off February 11th! More than a dozen show hosts will rally their listeners to learn about and donate to the Spare a Rose, Save a Child campaign. The idea behind Spare a Rose is simple: buy one less rose this Valentine’s Day and donate the value of that flower to children with diabetes. Donations go to Life for a Child, an International Diabetes Federation program which provides life-saving diabetes supplies, medication, and education that children in developing countries need to stay alive.

You’ll see a lot of posts and information this month about Spare a Rose and Life for a Child. During #DPodcastWeek we’ll talk about the campaign on our shows, but mostly it’ll be the same great info and conversations about T1D we strive to create every episode.

spareIDFI’m excited that this year, you’ll hear some new voices on familiar shows. A lot of the hosts have made promos that will play in the other podcasts.  Which brings me back to why competition isn’t really a thing here. In podcasting, you listen when you want. You don’t miss my show if you listen to another. Most podcast listeners subscribe to more than 4 shows and many listen to 10 or more every week. And with diabetes, we all have a different story. Find the show and the host that speaks to you, as a parent of the T1D child, as an adult with diabetes as a person who wants info about food or sports or whatever. It’s all out there. Don’t believe me? Here’s this year’s list:

#DPodcastWeek 2018:

Beta Cell Podcast – Craig Stubing

Bravest  – Craig Kasper

Chronically Motivated – Chris Ruden

Diabetes Connections – Stacey Simms

The DiaCast – Adi, Brent & Cas

Diabetes by the Numbers – Stephen Shaul

Diabetics Doing Things -Rob Howe

Diabetic Running Podcast – John Foti

Divabetic – Max Szadek.

The Guilt-Free RD – Melissa Joy Dobbins

Just Talking – Christopher Snider

Type 1 Entrepreneur – Chris Stocker

Real Life Diabetes – Amber Clour & Ryan Fightmaster

Want to jump in or learn more? Get in touch: stacey@diabetes-connections.com.

Make sure to tune in! Diabetes podcast week begins February 11, 2018.

Diabetes Forecast: People to Know

“Diabetes Forecast®, the Healthy Living Magazine of the American Diabetes Association, names Stacey Simms as one of 12 People to Know for 2017.”

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Me & Ben Vereen? Are you kidding? What else to say, but thank you!? (Click here to see the issue online)

Thank you to the editors and the committee who puts together the issue. Thanks to Jonathan Shuffield who interviewed me for the issue and editor Kelly Rawlings who informed me I was on the list. You can hear both of them on the podcast this week (click the handy player down below to listen right now).

But really, this is a thank you to you, my listeners. I’d like to say I started Diabetes Connections because I had a singular desire to help people. That I wanted to help newly diagnosed families realize it would be okay and help long-time T1Ds find new inspiration and motivation. Honestly? It’s because I couldn’t stop talking back to my radio.

After working in broadcasting my entire career, the brutal hours finally caught up with me. But when I left my early morning radio job, I found myself talking back to the podcasts I listened to, the radio shows I enjoyed. One day while walking my dog and yelling at Terri Gross, I knew I had to start my own show.

Just over two years later, to have this kind of validation is an incredible feeling. But it only confirms what I already know from emails, social media messages and, when I’m really lucky, in-person meetups. Listening to the voices of our community is helpful. Hearing stories of connection is vital. And knowing we’re not alone is invaluable. I’m here to tell those stories. Thanks for allowing me that privilege.

(click on the big blue play button to listen right here)


 

 

More Than Diabetes #DBlogWeek


Lets wrap up the week by sharing a little more about ourselves, beyond the chronic illness we or our loved ones live with.  Share an interest, hobby, passion, something that is YOU.  If you want to explore how it relates to or helps with diabetes you can.   Or let it be a part of you that is completely separate from diabetes, because there is more to life than just diabetes!  (This topic is a suggestion from the 2016 #DBlogWeek survey.)

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I’m glad the last day of Diabetes Blog Week asks us to write about something other than diabetes. Turns out, I was unable to participate in most of this event this year, and for once, diabetes wasn’t to blame. Amazing, right?

Most of the stories I share are about my son with type 1, or my family’s experience with diabetes. I rarely talk or write about my daughter or share a lot of stories about my kiddos that don’t have to do with T1D. They’re at the age where they’re old enough to have their own stories. And we have a family policy of not over-sharing on social media. That means I don’t get to brag about the good stuff often enough to satisfy me, but it also means fewer possible embarrassments for them later on. I hope!

This past week, my daughter needed me. Do you know I have a daughter? I do! She’s 15, she a great kid and the total package of smarts, looks and sarcasm. (You can listen to her one and only public appearance on the podcast here. Kid doesn’t like public speaking or attention. The family rebel!) Something came up, it took more time than she usually needs from us, and now everything is back to normal.

Sure, I’m a D-Mom, but I’m also just a regular mom. And sometimes diabetes can go into the background when more important stuff comes calling.

Lea in 2007(!)

Lea in 2007(!)

 

Learn more about Diabetes Blog Week here and go read some terrific posts!

Expect the Unexpected #DBlogWeek

Hey! It’s Diabetes Blog Week again! All week amazing people in the Diabetes Online Community will be sharing their thoughts on all sorts of cool topics. Karen Graffeo organizes this event every year – I spoke to her for the podcast last week. You can listen here (Karen’s interview starts at 39:00):

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Today’s topic: Diabetes can sometimes seem to play by a rulebook that makes no sense, tossing out unexpected challenges at random.  What are your best tips for being prepared when the unexpected happens? 

After more than ten years of type 1 diabetes, I can say that the only thing you can be ready for IS the unexpected. Especially with kids. Site comes off during a birthday party? Low-carb drink turns out to be big time sugar? Too much sand in an inset to reinsert? Yup. It happens. While I never like that feeling of “fix it later,” we’ve learned that Benny is more resilient and diabetes is less of an emergency than I ever thought it would be during those first few scary months after diagnosis.

My husband likes to say the backup plan is more important than the actual plan. That came in handy when he was a TV newscast  director and we’ve found it to be true for diabetes in action!

As just one example, a while back we took the kids snow tubing. Slade and I grew up in New York, but our children are snow-deprived. The Charlotte area gets maybe 1-2 inches a year and rarely all at once. We’re more likely to get ice or slushy yuck. Once every couple of years, we get 3-4 inches all at once and the kids go bananas.

That Saturday, we bundled everyone up and headed off to the mountains. I packed two changes of clothes and extra socks and shoes for everyone. We don’t have actual winter clothes (no ski jackets or pants) and I assumed there’d be a lot of slush and wet and general yuck. I also threw in our diabetes bag.

Benny carries his meter and a juice box wherever he goes. For the last few years, he’s used a leather pouch. It’s really a golf tee/supply bag, but it’s a great fit and Benny doesn’t feel like he’s carrying a purse!  When we take a day trip or we’ll be out for a while, I throw a bigger diabetes bag in the car. This one can hold our pump supplies, extra strips, insulin, needles, etc.   In the summer, I put the insulin vial in a Frio. Somehow, it all fits.

A day outside in the mountains means stopping on the road for a big breakfast. Our kids love the Waffle House and I’ve resigned myself to eating there (I try not to watch the grease on the grill). After something smothered & covered, Slade and Benny figured out the carbs and Benny started to bolus. They both looked up at me with that “something’s wrong” look. “The pump says there’s only one unit left,” Slade said.

What? How is that possible? Why didn’t the pump alarm go off? Oh wait….

That’s when I remembered Benny waking up at 1am, stumbling into my room muttering, “My pump’s making noise.” The reminder alarm was going off, indicating the pump only had 10 units of insulin left. I confirmed the alarm (which turns it off) and told him we’d change the cartridge in the morning.  Of course, in the morning all I remembered was that I was pretty tired for some reason.

We paid the bill and walked to the car. I had the diabetes bag, so I knew we should be all set. But while I was reassuring Benny and Lea everything would be fine, I was trying to remember if I’d double checked the bag and if I could even remember the last time I’d reloaded everything. We were at least an hour from home and, I have to admit, I was nervous. But, it was all there.  One quick cartridge change in the car, giant breakfast bolus and on our way to tubing (which reminds me, I really should put some extra pump tubing in the bag).

I love it when a backup plan comes together.

(partially reprinted from a 2013 post)